Interior Style

Why these nostalgic aesthetics will be making an unexpected comeback

Article by Homes to Love

Some of your favourites from Grannies home are making their way back into the interior good-books. Here’s what you should be prepared to see making a comeback

Photography by: Lisa Cohen. Styling by: Bree Leech. Dulux Lyttleton Quarter (left) and Dulux Tapawera Pancake Mix (right).

As the trend wheel continues to turn, we’re seeing old favourites recycled in new and exciting ways. The Dulux Colour Forecast for 2020 hints we might be in for a turn of nostalgia as 70s disco, Arts and Crafts and themes from the 80s make their way back into our homes.

Ruching, drapery and layering:

Photography by: Lisa Cohen. Styling by: Bree Leech.

The idea of ‘perfect interiors’ has had its day, says Dulux colour specialist Davina Harper. Instead, it’s time to embrace frayed edges, time-worn finishes and layering, ruching and draping of sumptuous velvets and chenilles.

“We’re looking to make our home a haven away from all the challenges of the outside world,” says Davina. “It’s nice to cocoon ourselves in comfort.”

Photography by: Lisa Cohen. Styling by: Bree Leech. Dulux Henna Red.

Colours that work well with this lush, romantic look are dark and rich. “Selecting a decadent paint colour, such as a rich red or earthy brown can add a sense of sophistication, while also creating a soothing space,” she says.

With 70s disco and art deco in mind, look for burgundy, eggplant, earthy browns, faded terracotta and soft coral to make this look come alive.

Blue is back:

Photography by: Lisa Cohen. Styling by: Bree Leech. Dulux Cameo Blue Half

“Blue is very easy to live with,” says Davina. It enjoyed heydays in the 70s, 90s and is a staple colour in French interior style. Davina says a “standout colour in Milan this year was a colour called Yves Klein Blue, named after the French artist Yves Klien. It’s bold and vibrant and can be seen everywhere.”

Photography by: Lisa Cohen. Styling by: Bree Leech. Dulux Master Blue and Dulux Southern Alps.

“Blue is a great colour for hallways, bathrooms, laundries and bedrooms,” says Davina. “A dark navy such as Poor Knights or a bold shade such as Master Blue can also make a stunning feature wall or front door.”

Create a tonal blue colour scheme for a serene, calming look, or pair blue with a crisp white for a refreshing aesthetic.

Time to embrace brown:

Photography by: Lisa Cohen. Styling by: Bree Leech. Dulux Fantan.

Don’t think of the awful brown painted on the exterior of your community hall in the 60s. These browns are earthy greys, warm, rustic and easy to incorporate into your home.

Photography by: Lisa Cohen. Styling by: Bree Leech. Dulux Knot.

“Browns and neutrals work well in Kiwi homes as they go well with timber floors and natural materials,” Davina says. “Brown is such a versatile colour, it can add a real sense of warmth and comfort to your home.”

She suggests incorporating brown into a study or a bedroom and to pair with warm neutrals and texture to create a nurturing and soothing space.

Purple reigns:

Photography by: Lisa Cohen. Styling by: Bree Leech. Dulux Deep Exquisite.

“We are seeing purple, lilac and lavender coming through strongly in both interiors and fashion at the moment,” says Davina. Lilac is a particularly nostalgic hue and its resurgence talks to our tendency to draw from the past for inspiration.

Purples such as Deep Exquisite and Mulberry Taste (dark, rich hues) are designed to be used as highlight colours, either across a wall, on the front door or in a little nook for “a touch of flair and individuality,” she says.

Photography by: Lisa Cohen. Styling by: Bree Leech. Dulux Trentham and Dulux Cardrona.

“I love the idea of painting your front door in a bold colour to add personality to the outside of your home, as well as giving people a hint of what’s to come inside”

Lilac and lavender lend themselves more to the neutral look and can, therefore, be used for complete room wall colour or for a fun bedding look.

Coloured glass:

Photography by: Lisa Cohen. Styling by: Bree Leech. Dulux Te Aroha.

mostly throughout the 90s, sump glass or textured glass is beginning to see a resurgence. Davina says this popular design feature is being used for furniture and partitions, but also in coloured glass accessories such as vases and ornaments.

“Colours and textures in our Cultivate palette [tonal greens]… look beautiful when paired with raw, mid-tone timbers, natural stone and transparent, coloured glass,” she says.


Words by: Bea Taylor

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