Planting

How to grow plants from cuttings

Article by Homes to Love

Have you got your eye on a plant in a friend’s garden and want the same type of plant of your own? It’s easy – take a cutting

Winter-planting_F

How to grow plants from cuttings

Not only is growing plants from cuttings rewarding and cheap, it’s easy! The best time to do it is late autumn/early winter. One of the most important things to consider is the plant’s natural habitat. There is no point placing the plant in a spot that will be too sunny or shady. Find out where it likes to grow. How much water and sunlight does it like?

Here are 8 simple steps to get you started:

1.

Try and take cuttings in the morning while it’s cool. Choose tip pieces ideally that are at least 10cm long, with a minimum of two sets of leaves. If you can’t replant them straight away, the best option is to wrap them in damp paper and put into the refrigerator until you’re ready to start.

2.

Remove bottom leaves and cut just below the node (the spot where the bottom leaf or leaves were attached to the stem). Make sure you choose healthy stems of the plant you want to grow – not too firm and not to floppy.

3.

Use the knife or blade to scrape down the side at the base of the stem for about the last centimetre. In this area roots have a higher chance of developing.

4.

Dip the base of the cutting into water and then into a small amount of liquid rooting hormone. With a pencil, create a small hole in some seed-raising mix in a pot.

5.

Insert the cutting into the hole and gently firm the mix to hold it upright.

6.

You can put more than one cutting into a pot.

7.

Water with a gentle spray and cover with a plastic bag to withhold moisture. Place in a warm shaded location. Keep an eye on the plant to ensure soil stays moist.

8.

Varying on the plant type, cuttings can start producing roots in a few weeks or months. After about 6-8 weeks ease out one of the cuttings to see if roots have formed on the base. After they have, each cutting can be transplanted into a pot and fed with plant food.

Image by: Maree Homer/ bauersyndication.com.au

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