Award winning homes

Revealed: our Home of the Year 2016 finalists

Article by Home Magazine

The judges have toured the country, and made their choices. Now HOME magazine is delighted to announce the finalists in the Home of the Year 2016, sponsored by Altherm Window Systems

The Supreme Winner of New Zealand’s richest architectural prize (the winning architects receive $15,000) will be announced at an event in Auckland on Wednesday 30 March  – but first, we want to tell you who’s in the running for the top award, as well as the categories of Best Small Home, Best City Home, and Best Multi-Unit Residential project.

Our congratulations to all the finalists. Look out for full coverage of the winner and finalists in HOME’s special Home of the Year issue, which will be on newsstands the day after the award announcement.

The finalists are displayed here in order from north to south:

In the Auckland suburb of Ponsonby, the ‘Villameter’ (below) is a new home that reinterprets villa characteristics in a contemporary way. It’s by London-based New Zealand architect Anthony Hoete of WHAT Architecture.

The 'Villameter' by WHAT Architecture. Photograph by Patrick Reynolds.

The ‘Villameter’ by WHAT Architecture. Photograph by Patrick Reynolds.

 

This Auckland home (below) by four-time Home of the Year winners Stevens Lawson Architects overlooks the Waitemata Harbour and features interiors by Katie Lockhart.

An Auckland home by Stevens Lawson Architects with interiors by Katie Lockhart. Photo by Mark Smith.

An Auckland home by Stevens Lawson Architects with interiors by Katie Lockhart. Photo by Mark Smith.

 

In a neighbourhood of light-industrial buildings, architects Andrea Bell and Andrew Kissell have designed a home (below) for themselves and their two young children, creating a family haven in a tough urban environment.

Architects Andrea Bell and Andrew Kissell's family home in city-fringe Auckland. Photograph by Simon Devitt.

Architects Andrea Bell and Andrew Kissell’s family home in city-fringe Auckland. Photograph by Simon Devitt.

 

In an isolated valley on the Coromandel Peninsula, Herbst Architects (winners of the Home of the Year award in 2012) designed a small home for a couple using recycled materials that reference nearby farm sheds.

A Coromandel House by Herbst Architects that uses recycled roofing iron on its exterior. Photograph by Patrick Reynolds.

A Coromandel House by Herbst Architects that uses recycled roofing iron on its exterior. Photograph by Patrick Reynolds.

 

In Wellington’s Mount Victoria, Parsonson Architects (designers of the 2001 Home of the Year) dreamed up the Zavos Corner Apartments, which reference the neighbourhood’s building forms while providing higher-density accommodation.

The Zavos Corner Apartments in Wellington by Parsonson Architects. Photograph by Jeff Brass.

The Zavos Corner Apartments in Wellington by Parsonson Architects. Photograph by Jeff Brass.

 

And last but not least, a compact home near Queenstown by Anna-Marie Chin carves a bold contemporary form out of strict design guidelines.

A home near Queenstown by Anna-Marie Chin. Photograph by David Straight.

A home near Queenstown by Anna-Marie Chin. Photograph by David Straight.

 

The finalists were chosen from a shortlist compiled by the Home of the Year jury after HOME magazine’s open entry process. The judges – HOME editor Jeremy Hansen, Seattle-based architect Tom Kundig of Olson Kundig Architects, and Wellington-based architect Stuart Gardyne of Architecture + – visited 11 shortlisted homes in late January before choosing the finalists. The choice of the winner of the Supreme Award, of course, was far from easy. Stay tuned for the big reveal on the evening of Wednesday March 30!

Thanks again to our award sponsors, Altherm Window Systems:

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