Award winning homes

Family-friendly city living with an industrial edge

Article by Home Magazine

A finalist for 2016 Home of the Year and winner of Best City Home 2016, a new home in a tough semi-industrial neighbourhood brings family living to Auckland’s centre

Andrea Bell and Andrew Kissell’s home is a magnificent challenge to the conventional notion that the city is no place for children. Bell and Kissell have created an enviable home for themselves and their kids Oscar, four, and one-year-old Lulu, on an almost-hostile site without resorting to suburban design tropes. Their design shows how we can better use our cities by re-occupying areas once considered undesirable, rather than spreading stand-alone homes further and further from the centre.

Those visiting the home for the first time may raise an eyebrow when they can’t find a car park, when they aren’t greeted with a row of picket fences, or when they can’t see the large backyard. They might think, ‘kids can’t live here’. They will be challenged by the concept of family living in the city, but they will see that not only does it work, but it works really well.

Words by: Aimie Cronin; Photography by: Simon Devitt

A finalist for 2016 Home of the Year and winner of Best City Home 2016, a new home in a tough semi-industrial neighbourhood brings family living to Auckland’s centre

Andrea Bell and Andrew Kissell’s home is a magnificent challenge to the conventional notion that the city is no place for children. Bell and Kissell have created an enviable home for themselves and their kids Oscar, four, and one-year-old Lulu, on an almost-hostile site without resorting to suburban design tropes. Their design shows how we can better use our cities by re-occupying areas once considered undesirable, rather than spreading stand-alone homes further and further from the centre.

Those visiting the home for the first time may raise an eyebrow when they can’t find a car park, when they aren’t greeted with a row of picket fences, or when they can’t see the large backyard. They might think, ‘kids can’t live here’. They will be challenged by the concept of family living in the city, but they will see that not only does it work, but it works really well.

Words by: Aimie Cronin; Photography by: Simon Devitt

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